Shōsōin

Title

Shōsōin

Description

During the reign of Emperor Shomu (701-756 C.E), Japan endured a period of great cultural output brought about by state patronage. Throughout his life, Shomu devoted large sums of money for the creation of elaborate Buddhist temples and artifacts throughout the country. Having proclaimed himself a "servant of the Three Treasures" (the Buddha, the Buddhist law, and the monastic community), the emperor was responsible for turning Japan into one of the largest producers of Buddhist art and architecture in the East. One of the first temples founded is Shōsōin in Tōdai-ji, Nara from around 756 C.E.

Constructed in the "azekura" log-cabin style, Shōsōin features a raised floor and is the oldest surviving building of this type. It serves as a treasure house of over 600 objects spanning several centuries.

Original Format

Building

Physical Dimensions

Front width is about 33.1m, depth is about 9.3m, 1st floor height is about 2.5m.

Files

Shōsōin.JPG
Date Added
May 8, 2011
Collection
Architecture
Item Type
Still Image
Tags
,
Citation
“Shōsōin,” Artists, Patrons, and Japanese Art, accessed September 23, 2017, http://artistandpatrons.omeka.net/items/show/12.